Friday, September 19, 2014

For Illustration Friday ~ NOVELTY


Of course it would be a novelty if Pigs really could fly... and someday one of them just might!

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Our parents beautiful Log Home is for sale. On a hilltop in Southern Vermont it is both a hideaway, a peaceful retreat, and a place where the family and extended family can enjoy 67 acres of beauty, sports, and fun year round.

Tuesday, August 26, 2014


The Children’s Book Review | August 26, 2014
The Star Giver: A Legend from the Far, Far North By Ginger NielsonThe Star Giver
By Ginger Nielson
Paperback: 34 pages
Age Range: 3-7
Publisher: Virginia Neilson (September 1, 2014)
ISBN:978-0991309337
What to expect: Folktale, Bears, Stars, Illustrations
Ginger Nielson tells a soothing folktale set deep in the forest. When Little Bear asks, “Where did the stars come from?” Mother Bear leans in closely to share a Native American legend from “the far, far north.” Illustrations rich in deep nighttime colors create a peaceful visual to the comforting story of a man, made of stars and the branches of pines, who forever continues to spread starlight across the night sky. This man is known as the Star Giver.
“His gifts are hidden under an enormous cloak. Yet the starlight beneath sparkles through and lights his way wherever he wanders.”
Each night, the Star Giver travels through the forest to the sea. When he reaches the shoreline he opens his cloak and allows the wind to blow his stars into the aquatic scenery.
StarGiver-2
Illustration copyright © 2014 by Ginger Nielson from “The Star Giver”
The sea tosses them with “towering waves until they escape to the sky” where they stay until morning above the slumbering animals.
The Star Giver: A Legend from the Far, Far North By Ginger Nielson
Illustration copyright © 2014 by Ginger Nielson from “The Star Giver”
The Star Giver remains quiet and still until he opens his cloak and calls for the stars to return to him.
The Star Giver: A Legend from the Far, Far North By Ginger Nielson
Illustration copyright © 2014 by Ginger Nielson from “The Star Giver”
Dramatic brush strokes swirl across double page spreads expressing emotion and providing movement to the illustrations.
The nature of the story is mystical and therefore sure to open the slumbering doors of dreamtime if chosen as a bedtime read. Recommended for children ages 3 through 7.
Add this book to your collection: The Star Giver
About the Author
Ginger Nielson lives at the top of a hill, near the edge of a forest in semi-rural New Hampshire, USA. There is a magic wand on her desk, a dragon in her basement, and a tiny elephant in her studio. Everything else is nearly normal. Coming to the world of children’s illustration a bit later in life, Ginger was an elementary school teacher and art teacher before becoming a travel agent. Both of those careers enabled her to connect deeply with many children and many different cultures. To date she has illustrated over 45 children’s books. She is busy creating illustrations for other authors and writing and illustrating her own stories as well.

Monday, August 25, 2014

From the Reader Views :  Review for the Star Giver

THE STAR GIVER

Ginger Nielson
Ginger Nielson Children’s Books (2014)
ISBN 9780991309337
Reviewed by Miles Cassells (age 4) and Mom for Reader Views Kids (07/14)
It’s time for bed and Little Bear looks up into the sky and asks Mother Bear where the stars come from. Little Bear must close his eyes and listen carefully as Mother Bear tells the story of the Star Giver, a man made of stars and branches of pines. 
“The Star Giver” by Ginger Nielson is a beautiful story to read to young children when it’s time for bed. Not only did Miles love reading the book, he loved the illustrations. A few pages in, Miles said that “we need one of those on Earth.” (He has quite the fascination with knowing that we live on planet Earth.) When I asked him what he loves best about the book, Miles replied that he loves the bears and the man with the stars in his coat (cloak). 
 “The Star Giver” is a brilliant take on what to tell children when they ask where the stars come from. The story is told by Mother Bear to Little Bear at bedtime and explains how the Star Giver tosses the stars into the sea and the sea tosses the stars into the sky so that creatures below can sleep peacefully.
Bedtime can be such a hassle with young children and I surely have this issue with Miles almost daily. We like to read a book before bed and I always try to select a book that is calm and that will lead Miles into understanding that we need to rest for the next day. Having such a peaceful story to read to Miles is always at the top of my list. 
“The Star Giver” by Ginger Nielson will be a go-to book for many nights to come, I can already tell as Miles has had me read the story to him more than once. Ginger Nielson is a talented author and illustrator and I hope that she has more books in store. I highly recommend this title to others as “The Star Giver” is surely a fresh new way to look at the stars.


Sunday, August 24, 2014



Another review for The Star Giver arrived in my mail today. I would like to share that and another image from the book.  I am pleased to say that the review reflects the gentle tone of the book.

The Children’s Book Review | www.thechildrensbookreview.com
The Star Giver
By Ginger Neilson Paperback: 34 pages Age Range: 3-­‐7
Publisher: Virginia Neilson (September 1, 2014)  ISBN: 978-0991309337
What to expect: Folktale, Bears, Stars, Illustrations
Ginger Neilson tells a soothing folktale set deep in the forest. When Little Bear asks, “Where did the stars come from?” Mother Bear leans in closely to share a Native American legend from “the far, far north.” Illustrations rich in deep nighttime colors create a peaceful visual to the comforting story of a man, made of stars and the branches of pines, who forever continues to spread starlight across the night sky. This man is known as the Star Giver.

“His gifts are hidden under an enormous cloak. Yet the starlight beneath sparkles through and lights his way wherever he wanders.”
Each night, the Star Giver travels through the forest to the sea. When he reaches the shoreline he opens his cloak and allows the wind to blow his stars into the aquatic scenery. The sea tosses them with “towering waves until they escape to the sky” where they stay until morning above the slumbering animals. The Star Giver remains quiet and still until he opens his cloak and calls for the stars to return to him. Dramatic brush strokes swirl across double page spreads expressing emotion and providing movement to the illustrations. 
The nature of the story is mystical and therefore sure to open the slumbering doors of dreamtime if chosen as a bedtime read. Recommended for children ages 3 through 7.
—The Children’s Book Review (www.thechildrensbookreview.com)

Monday, July 28, 2014

This is a new trailer for The Star Giver....